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    Milton Keynes: the middle aged new-town ?

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    papa_umau
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    Milton Keynes: the middle aged new-town ?

    Post by papa_umau on Mon 23 Jan 2017, 11:32 am

    Most towns grow and evolve over hundreds if not thousands of years.

    Not so Milton Keynes, which is 50 years old. Perhaps the best known of the 20th Century "new towns", it has its detractors but is also much loved by its residents.

    The town was born with an Act of Parliament in 1967 which approved the building of a new community of 250,000 people covering 8,850 hectares (21,869 acres) of Buckinghamshire farmland and villages.

    Built to ease the housing shortages in overcrowded London, its founding principles were for an "attractive" town that enshrined "opportunity and freedom of choice".

    The full report from The BBC HERE




    Well folks, and especially you English folks that live in London's suburbia, what do you think of Milton Keynes now that it is fifty years old ?

    AND...What do you think of the plans getting underway to build more completely new "Garden villages" in the future ?

    Fourteen so-called "Garden villages" are being planned for the near future.

    Read about these plans from The Campaign to Protect Rural England website HERE



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    zathrus
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    Re: Milton Keynes: the middle aged new-town ?

    Post by zathrus on Fri 27 Jan 2017, 12:11 pm

    "Fourteen garden villages", I hear you say.

    As they are finding it hard to acquire land for building on brownfield sites, they are going to have to build these "garden villages" on farm-land.

    The Open Spaces Society found here: http://www.oss.org.uk/what-we-do/protecting-open-space/protecting-green-belt-land/?gclid=Cj0KEQiA_KvEBRCtzNil4-KR-LIBEiQAmgekF7OHELuttB9gH-s_wKYXCUt4XTQuD2TULoSE_kA7AHwaAiAb8P8HAQ might have something to say about that.
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    Re: Milton Keynes: the middle aged new-town ?

    Post by papa_umau on Sat 28 Jan 2017, 3:21 pm

    We also had a couple of these "new towns" built in Scotland to take the refugees from the slums of Glasgow and they were called Cumbernauld, ( once known as a "carbuncle" on the face of Scotland ) and Glenrothes, in Fife. Mind you, although these new towns were not very pretty, they were quite successful.

    I don't think that the governments have looked hard enough for brownfield sites, as I know of at least three in and around my own home town that could take hundreds of houses.


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    Re: Milton Keynes: the middle aged new-town ?

    Post by Angie baby on Sun 29 Jan 2017, 12:23 pm

    Well, if you're new-towns in Scotland are anything like Milton Keynes they will be awful places. I have a friend who lives in Milton Keynes and I hate visiting it and she hates living in it.
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    Re: Milton Keynes: the middle aged new-town ?

    Post by papa_umau on Mon 30 Jan 2017, 12:16 pm

    Our major new-town, Cumbernauld, was given the title of "carbuncle" because of it's central mall which straddled over the main road. It was bare concrete and really ugly to pass through, and like many other new-towns it was not designed with the other infrastructure that all towns need.

    Eventually most of the "town-like" add-ons that were not included in the original design did appear, but that ugly mall is still there.

    I guess that this all boils down to the fact that when designers are given a commission to design a new-town they are told to make it "as cost-effective as possible", and that is where the design falls down.

    Maybe the "garden villages" being built soon will not be like that ?

    HERE is a set of Google images of Cumbernauld that show how ugly it was and still is.


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    Re: Milton Keynes: the middle aged new-town ?

    Post by Hell's Granny on Thu 09 Feb 2017, 2:43 pm

    I moved out of the London area under the New Towns scheme, to Bracknell. It was quite nice, open plan estates, plenty of greenery, but little community. It seemed to be suffering an identity crisis, neither fish nor fowl. Now I live in Andover, another such town, and even so long after, there is still that same feeling of dislocation.
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    Re: Milton Keynes: the middle aged new-town ?

    Post by papa_umau on Fri 10 Feb 2017, 1:02 pm

    THAT, my dear, was the exact problem with the purpose-built new-towns.

    They had quite nice houses, but they lacked all of the infrastructure that a proper conurbation of people should have.

    I hope they do not repeat that mistake with the new "garden villages" they are planning.


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    Re: Milton Keynes: the middle aged new-town ?

    Post by Hell's Granny on Fri 10 Feb 2017, 2:15 pm

    Yes, Years of knowing everyone in your area fostered a close community spirit which is lacking in these artificial towns.

    The original ones, built by the big entrepeneurs of the Victorian Age, worked because they were built specifically for the workers of that Company; such as Cadbury, Huntley and Palmer, Port Sunlight, etc. Because everyone worked for the same company, the community spirit was maintained. Unfortunately, with the New Towns and Expanded towns, there were too many companies moving in and people were allocated housing piecemeal, effectively splitting up the 'communities', so they failed to prosper.

    I fear these new 'villages' may suffer in the same way.
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    Re: Milton Keynes: the middle aged new-town ?

    Post by papa_umau on Sat 11 Feb 2017, 11:47 am

    Yes HG, I too fear the same.

    Nice point about the housing supplied by the beneficial employers.

    We have one of these special accommodation housing schemes built by a local papermaking firm. They certainly worked well as far as community was concerned, but they also had one bad point: these homes were only available to the people who worked in the factories and they were tightly tied to the workers, who would lose their home if they left the employ.

    One of the greatest philanthropists in the world, ( and at that time was the richest man in the world ), was a Scot called Andrew Carnegie, who always thought carefully about his workers and who was so successful in humanity and in making money that he is still remembered fondly in Scotland.


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